Never Miss Important Information.

Sign up for Updates, Research, and Articles concerning Thanatophobia (Death Anxiety). 

Fight, Flight or Freeze.

In the context of death anxiety, individuals frequently exhibit an overactive sympathetic nervous system. Anxiety can lead to heightened physiological arousal even when no actual threat or danger is present. Consequently, individuals with anxiety disorders may experience rapid heart rate, increased perspiration, muscle tension, and a persistent sense of unease, even during routine activities such as work meetings or social interactions.

This phenomenon can be understood as a malfunctioning car with a perpetually stuck accelerator and ineffective brakes. The sympathetic system remains on high alert, reacting excessively to ordinary circumstances, and making it challenging for individuals with anxiety to regain a sense of calm and composure.

Fight

Our body must confront the threat head-on when the fight response is triggered. Adrenaline and other stress hormones are released, increasing heart rate, muscle blood flow, and energy levels. This heightened state of arousal readies us for physical confrontation or self-defence. The fight response is adaptive when we believe we can overcome the threat or challenge.

Flight

The flight response involves a strong urge to escape or flee from the threatening situation. The same release of stress hormones occurs, but in this case, the body prepares to mobilise its energy for rapid movement. This response is advantageous when the perceived threat is too overwhelming or dangerous to confront directly, and running away becomes the best chance for survival.

Freeze

The freeze response is a form of immobility where the body temporarily shuts down or becomes still in response to the threat. It is often observed in animals as a survival strategy when they perceive a potential predator. In humans, the freeze response can manifest as a feeling of being paralysed or unable to act. This response might occur when the individual feels overwhelmed and unable to determine whether fighting or fleeing is feasible.

Athletes can use the fight/flight anxiety mechanism to motivate and focus. This can help them stay focused on their task and stay in the present moment. By using the adrenaline and other hormones released by this mechanism, athletes can power their performance and help them push themselves harder. Additionally, by understanding the physical changes in their body, athletes can use the fight/flight response to help them stay calm, relaxed, and focused during competition. Non-athletes can also benefit from the fight/flight anxiety mechanism by using it to motivate themselves and focus on their task. By understanding the physical changes that occur and the hormones released during this response, non-athletes can use it to stay focused and relaxed during stressful situations. Additionally, non-athletes can use the adrenaline released to power their performance and help them stay motivated. Finally, understanding the fight/flight response can help non-athletes better manage their stress and anxiety levels.

 So, we know that anxiety and the flight/flight mechanism can be used positively to cope with death anxiety. 

Tags

#connected-conditions, #death-anxiety, risk factors


You may also like

ADHD – How is it tested?
{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}

Are you looking for direct, successful freedom from Death Anxiety?

>